Category Archives: Etiquette

How To Correctly Word Your Wedding RSVP Card

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Your invite wording is checked off your list, and now you are wondering how formal, funky, or traditional you want to phrase your wedding RSVP card.how to correctly word your wedding rsvp cardOld traditions are a blank card that would be provided for the guest to write a hand-written response if they would be attending, and add blessings for the couple. Now, we provide more of a form for guests to provide info you need to plan your day-of properly. You will provide them a card, and adequate postage for its return back to you.

correctly word wedding RSVP card

Wedding RSVP cards or ‘Response Cards’ are standard in all invitation suites however, ceremony only weddings do not require them.

Let’s break it down…

Response Request Line & Date

Kindly Reply, Respond, Favour, Favor?!

Most Simplistic:

RSVP by the 6th of June

Reply by the 6th of June

Kindly Reply by the 6th of June

Kindly Respond by the 6th of June

*The date can be 6th or sixth

Most Traditional:

The honour of your presence is requested by the sixth of June (for weddings held in a church)

The honor of your presence is requested by the sixth of June (for weddings held outside a place of worship)

The pleasure of your company is requested by the sixth of June

About the “reply by” date:

It is crucial for you, your caterer and venue to have an accurate head count day-of. We recommend 1-2 weeks before your vendors request your final numbers which makes your RSVP by date typically about 3-4 weeks before the wedding.

“Fill in the Blank” Name Line

What’s that darn “M_________________” on the rsvp card and why? It’s another “traditional” fill in the blank and this is how you should use it:

Ms. Jillian Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. James Carter

Mr. James Carter

Ms. Jillian Williams and Guest (if you have a plus one)

Mr. James Carter and Guest (if you have a plus one)

Alternatives to the “M” is simply saying “Name:”

 

Accepts & Regrets Line(s)

This is the fun part of an RSVP card – mix and match, make your own, or use these pairings:

• Yes // No

• Accept // Declines 

• Accepts with Pleasure // Declines with Regret

• Joyfully Accepts // Regretfully Declines

• Attending // Not Attending

• Let’s Party // I’m Missing Out

• Can’t Wait // Can’t Come

• Toasting // Toasting from Afar

• Wouldn’t Miss it for the World // I’ll Be There in Spirit

• Oh Yeah! // Boo, Can’t Make it!

Number Attending Line

Most often this is placed under the “accepts” line.

It can be overall: “Number Attending”

or if you need to know a children count stack these two:

“Number of Adults Attending”

“Number of Children Attending”

Optional Meal Selection

BUFFET: You can use the “Number Attending” above.

SAME ENTREE FOR ALL: You can use the “Number Attending” above.

IF YOU ARE OFFERING A CHILDREN’S MEAL:  Add the  “Number of Children Attending”

PLATED MEAL WITH ESCORT CARDS: You will show icons or words for meal selection and have them place a # beside their choice.

PLATED MEAL WITH ESCORT & PLACE CARDS: You will show icons or words for meal selection and have them place the guests initials beside their choice.

IN ADDITION: There may be some people in your guest list who you might be unaware have special dietary restrictions, it’s not uncommon to ask if they have special diet requirements!

As you know, we believe every wedding is different, and this RSVP card is a great place to share your personalities, and ask for personalized info.

Some additional, more casual, and fun things couples sometimes include are:

• Guests needing transportation (if you are providing it)

• Date of guests arrival

• Where guests are making their accommodations

• Asking for a song request

• Mad-lib style layout

So what are you waiting for? Let’s start wording those wedding RSVP cards and get your guests to your wedding.

Toast Etiquette

Posted by in Etiquette

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The Do’s and Don’ts When Writing Your Next Toast

Whether this is your first time being the Maid of Honor or you’re an old-timer, giving a killer speech can be nerve racking and challenging. At most weddings, the best man claims the “unforgettable speech of the night” while the Maid of Honorrgives a sweet and standard toast to close up. Here are the do’s and don’ts to make your toast just as heart-warming and energetic when raising your glass to the happy couple.


DO

Set the scene with a little background on your relationship. Imply that the day’s event marks a break of sorts.

DOn’T

Tell stories that dredge up childhood memories of hilarious times you shared with the bride or groom that nobody else in the room knows about or cares about.


DO

Insert comic relief with a light ribbing. (Key word: light)

DON’T

No need to freak if your joke tanks. Encourage a sympathy laugh by saying, “That was supposed to be funny,” no one wants you to feel uncomfortable!


DO

Your speech needs to be about the friend you knew long before the groom, and then pivot to what role the groom has played in your friend’s life. Keep it simple, start with the bride and end with the couple.

DON’T

Bring in Ex-Boyfriends (yours or theirs.) Save the funny stories for your next girls night.


DO

Wrap it up, ditch the generic praise, and raise your glass to the happy couple.

DON’T

While we usually need liquid courage, make sure not to over do it. Think twice before you clink!


 * Photo sourced from Stone Crandell
* Written by Meredith Heins

Traditional or Modern Etiquette?

Posted by in Etiquette

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If you are newly engaged, you are probably concerned with the way you present your wedding, from your engagement to the the thank you notes as newlyweds – making sure every “i” is dotted and every “t” is crossed. Planning a wedding is exciting, but it is filled with emotion and plenty of decision making – none of which are right or wrong.

Etiquette has evolved, and the line between formality and personality can be blurred now more than ever. We believe in traditional sentimental details, and warm family traditions — but we do live in a new time where brides can express themselves without all the rules from previous generations.

Here at Méldeen, we will help you stick to what is important, and voice what is comfortable to you. We realize each couple is unique and each situation is different. If you use common sense, and go with your gut, you won’t regret a thing. Ultimately, this is a day to celebrate the love you have for each other and christen the new adventure you are starting together!

Just as no couples are alike, neither should any wedding stationery. That’s why we do what we do! We create something that reflects you, your unique style, and bring the things that are important to you to your guests attention. Show the information that is important to you, and don’t worry about what you leave out. After all, this is one of the most special correspondences you will ever send. The stationery should tangibly represent your wedding day, and all the work leading up to it.

Pick all the elements you want to see in your wedding suite- like RSVP envelope, additional insert cards, double envelopes, and liners. No pressure if you decide that investing in some of these elements is not important to you!

*Photo by www.hootonimages.com

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Invitation Wording

Posted by in Etiquette

Blog-WordingGraphic

Now what should it say?

Composing your wedding invitation

Etiquette should never be adhered to at the cost of relationships. These are just guidelines, but do what feels most comfortable for those mentioned on this special stationery.

First, let’s learn a little and talk about the each line!


HOST LINE(s):

Traditionally, the host line lists the parents, or the couple. This line is reserved for the people hosting or funding the wedding. These days, many brides use this line to honor a family involved, acknowledging who is contributing financially and/or emotionally for their wedding.

If you are personally funding the wedding, there is nothing wrong with listing your names as the hosts. Many couples add “along with their families” to acknowledge the emotional support of their parents or to be respectfully vague about a complicated family or financial situation.

For middle names, you can choose to use them, use an initial, or omit. This is strictly personal preference.

Most traditional for married parents of the bride:
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Jacob Williams

If divorced or separated, the woman’s name always comes first, and the names appear on two lines – Omit the word “and”. The use of the word links the names together as married.
Ms. Mary Williams
Mr. Daniel Williams

For parents that are divorced and one or both has remarried, you may list both sets, or you may choose to just list your biological parents only like shown above but with “Mrs.” for the woman.
Ms. Mary Williams
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Williams
or
Mrs. Mary Jacobsen and Mr. John Jacobson
Mr. Daniel Williams
or
Ms. Mary Jacobsen and Mr. John Jacobson
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Williams

To list groom’s family, you can list them under the bride’s parent’s names or below the groom himself – if divorced same rules as above applies:
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Jacob Williams
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Baily
request the honor of your presence
or
Groom Name
son of
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Baily
Date

For parents who are doctors:
If both are: The Doctors Williams
If Father is: Doctor and Mrs. Daniel Williams
If the Mother is: Doctor Mary Williams and Mr. Daniel Williams

For mothers who have kept their maiden name, she should appear on the first like with the word “and” linking them to the father.
Mrs. Mary Johnson and Mr. Daniel Williams

Ministers are referred to as:
The Revered and Mrs. Daniel Williams
or
The Reverend Mary Williams and Mr. Daniel Williams

Other titles:

  • Military titles can be listed but not abbreviated
  • Ph.D. titles are only used in academic settings.
  • Listing Judges as “The Honorable” can come across presumptuous, unless you know that is their preferred “title” over “Mr.” or “Judge”.

REQUEST LINE(s):

For weddings held in a church, you use the word “honour”
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of
or
the pleasure of your company
at the marriage of

For weddings held outside of a place of worship, it typically reads:
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of
or
the pleasure of your company
at the marriage of


COUPLES NAMES :

Traditionally:
Brides First & Middle, no Last Name
to
Mr. Grooms Full Name

More current:
Brides First Middle Last
to
Grooms First Middle Last

It is also okay to omit one or both of the middle names.

You will also want to list titles if applies, with no abbreviation:

  • Doctor
  • Junior, II, III, etc. You can use, or omit the comma before it
  • Military Titles (if prefer)

DATE LINE:

The day of the week, the month and the year are all spelled out.
Numbers are used for more casual and quirky designs.
Saturday, the twenty-fifth of June
Two thousand and fifteen
or
Saturday, June 25, 2014


TIME LINE:

You can list time simply as “four o’clock” or as formal as “four o’clock in the afternoon”
Just like the time, numbers can be used for more casual and quirky invites.
4:00


LOCATION:

The location lists the place, address, and city & state. No zip code.
Cities of New York City and Washington D.C are exceptions, and are simply listed with no state: New York and Washington, District of Columbia
If the location is held in someones home, it is listed as the “The Daniel’s Residence”

When the reception is held at the same place, you can smile have “reception to follow” – otherwise, you will list the reception to follow along with “location”, “address, city and state”.


ATTIRE:

Additional blog post coming soon!


QUICK VISUALS

From the Brides Parents
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Williams
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
Saturday the 15th of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

From the Brides divorced Parents
Mrs. Mary Williams
Mr. Daniel Williams
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
Saturday, the fifteenth of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

Acknowledgment of Both Parents
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Williams
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
son of
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Bailey
Saturday, the fifteenth of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

Both Sets host:
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Williams
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Bailey
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
Saturday, the fifteenth of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

Couple Hosts
The honor of your presence is requested
at the marriage of
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
or
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
request the honor of your presence
at their marriage

Both sets of parents are divorced:
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Williams
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
son of
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Bailey
Saturday, the fifteenth of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

or

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Williams
Mr. & Mrs. Blake Henry Bailey
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Jillian Elizabeth Williams
to
James Carter Bailey
Saturday, the fifteenth of June
Two thousand fifteen
Seven o’clock in the evening
The Haley Vineyards
12345 Peach Tree Trail
Austin, Texas

If you have questions, or would like to know more about religious, military or cultural etiquette, please get in touch info@meldeen.com

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